Mexico Information for Retirees

THE LANGUAGE

This really had Dick and me worried – until I again researched pretty widely.

Spanish, of course, is the official language. That means directional signs, street signs, etc., will be in Spanish. Phone books will be in Spanish.

However, the influx of Europeans has resulted in a lot of Mexicans knowing English.

Don’t count on everyone having the patience to quiz you enough to find out just what you want. Learn a smiggin’ – at least – of Spanish.

After all, we are going to another country. When in Rome…

busy street corner - bus - nanchi, mail boxAnd Mexicans really do appreciate the fact that you are learning and at least trying to use their language.

Don’t be surprised that the business you are heading to has closed for a lunch break from 2 to 4 p.m.

 

DID YOU KNOW:

The capital of Mexico is Mexico City in the Distrito Federal,

¼ of Mexico’s population live in the Mexico City area,

The approximate population of Mexico is 95 million.

There are pyramids in Mexico. Most notable being about 30 miles northeast of Mexico City, at Teotihuacan, built around 100 B.C.

Home Insurance, in Mexico is very reasonable, because most construction is cement – stucco – not many fires there.

Medical Evacuation (from Mexico to U.S. by air) insurance is offered in Mexico, though some people don’t feel it’s at all necessary.

You can approximate converting a peso to a dollar just by multiplying the dollar amount by 10.  Visa Versa, divide the peso amount by 10 – just drop the last digit.

This is a great site for instant currency rates and exchange.  http://www.xe.com/ucc/

To: Barbara

“The cost of living here is about 30% less than what it was costing us in St. Louis. We pay less than $14 US for Internet Service. Telephone charges are about $20 US per month, unless my wife decides to talk with her girlfriend in St. Louis for another hour!”  Joe

YES VIRGINIA…

There really are SAM’s Clubs in Mexico!  There’s a SAM’s In Mazatlan!

Make sure you read all my free reports and newsletters here – you’ll find handy lists of daily usage words, translated English to Spanish.

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